Forts in Goa

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Mormugao fort

Mormugao FortMormugao fort is known for its magnificient look and structure and was considered as one of the most important coastal forts of Goa. It was built to protect the harbour situated near the Vasco da Gama town. It is also very popular with respect to historical significance. This fort also had many ancient articles like 20 bulwarks, three magazines, five prisons, a chapel and quarters for the guard. But now only the chapel and a portion of the boundary wall is left. The fort is also very close to Varca beach. One get to see the beautiful views of the Mormugao port from this fort.

It is situated at the extreme northwestern point of Salsete and guard the entrance to the port. Located just north of Vasco Da Gama city and just south of Mormugao Port, this is the closest fort to Goa's airport. Primarily, Mormugao was generalized to be the capital of the Portuguese empire, hence the fort was erected and in 1703 the viceroy moved into the town.

 

An inscription over the fort of the gate reads (in translation from the Portuguese): The Catholic King Dom Filippe, the third of this name, reigning in Portugal, Dom Francisco da Gama, fourth Count of Vidigueira, Admiral of India, a member of His Majesty's Council and a Gentleman of the Royal Household, being Viceroy for the second time, this Fortress was begun, the first stone being laid on ...April 1624….".

 

The Maratha warriors continued to attack the town and the fort and finally the Portuguese gave up the township in preference for Old Goa. As, a main constituent of Goan history, and being one of the most important India forts it is also very popular with those indulging in historical travel activities of Goa.

The fortress is about 10 km in circumference and boasts of possessing some ancient articles like 20 bulwarks, three magazines, five prisons, a chapel and quarters for the guard. There were two beautiful fountains. The Fonte de Malabar kept the royal arms and was said to bob up from a gold mine and the Fonte de Santo Ignacio which had a more modest beginning in a sulphur mine.

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